Category Archives: Hunting and Shooting News

The latest in industry news, product launches, company profiles etc etc

What Does The Most Expensive Rifle in the World Look Like?

vo falcon boltThe VO Falcon made by Swedish firearm manufacturer VO Vapen features Damascus steel octagonal barrels, the stock is made from the finest of walnut root and is a takedown design so you can switch the barrel to use a different cartridge. It has intricate engraving honouring the art of falconry. Continue reading What Does The Most Expensive Rifle in the World Look Like?

Obama’s Desire For Australia’s Gun Laws Will Not Solve the USA’s Problem.

Official_portrait_of_Barack_ObamaMany Australian’s today are giving themselves a pat on the back for Australia’s gun laws on social media. US President Barrack Obama came out and stated that Australia has got it’s gun laws right as reported here in The Sydney Morning Herald:

Obama praises Australia’s gun control, brings country into US gun debate

 

The problem is that his view on the issue is far too simplified and does not take into account the finer points. Continue reading Obama’s Desire For Australia’s Gun Laws Will Not Solve the USA’s Problem.

CSIRO Study: The expenditure and motivation of Australian recreational hunters.

red-foxThe CSIRO have just released an abstract of a peer reviewed study that is to be published in the scientific journal Wildife Research.

Between September 2011 and June 2012 7,202 hunters participated in an anonymous survey. In the abstract of the study it was revealed that there is an estimated 200,000-300,000 hunters in Australia and that they spend over $1 billion annually on hunting  with an average annual individual spend directly of $1835 and $2168 indirectly. 99% of respondents said they would be willing to participate in pest control activities if the opportunity arose. The abstract then goes on to say:

The Australian recreational hunting community is large, active and willing to spend large amounts of money on hunting. Their activities need to be understood and participants engaged by wildlife managers in order to obtain the best outcomes for wildlife management in Australia. 

The study seems to suggest what hunters have known all along: Hunters are an under utilised and extremely valuable asset who are willing to spend their own money participating in wildlife management. Unfortunately This is something that Australian State and Federal Governments fail to realise but hopefully they will take note of this study. It will be very interesting to read the full study when it is published. Here is the Abstract: http://www.publish.csiro.au/view/journals/dsp_journals_pip_abstract_Scholar1.cfm?nid=144&pip=WR13171

The expenditure and motivation of Australian recreational hunters Neal Finch, Peter Murray, Julia Hoy, Greg Baxter Abstract Abstract Context: Recreational hunting has a long history in Australia, as in other parts of the world. However, the number, characteristics and motivations of Australian hunters have never been investigated in the same way as other countries where hunting occurs. Aims: In this report we aimed to systematically survey Australian recreational hunters to determine their demographic characteristics, patterns of spending and motivations. Methods: Between September 2011 and June 2012 we encouraged hunters to participate in an anonymous, on-line survey hosted by SurveyMonkey. We asked 53 questions about the hunters, their hunting patterns, expenditure on hunting and their motivations to hunt. Key Results: 7,202 hunters responded to the survey. The respondents were overwhelmingly male and 67% were aged between 31 and 60 years. Almost 34% of respondents were from Victoria, 26.7% from NSW and 22.0% from Queensland. Average direct expenditure on hunting was $1,835 per person per annum while indirect expenditure was $2,168. Over 99% of respondents said that they would be willing to participate in pest control activities if they had the opportunity. Conclusions: There are likely to be at least 200,000 and more likely 300,000 recreational hunters in Australia and they spend in excess of $1 billion dollars annually on hunting. Almost all of these hunters are willing to participate in direct wildlife management activities such as pest control. Implications: The Australian recreational hunting community is large, active and willing to spend large amounts of money on hunting. Their activities need to be understood and participants engaged by wildlife managers in order to obtain the best outcomes for wildlife management in Australia.