Finding game!

Is it an art or just luck?

A skill acquired by many years of experience out in the field or just in the right place at the right time?

Something that seems to get thrown around by a lot of new hunters or ones that have spent some time in the bush but have had very limited success, where do I find the game?

Well it’s not luck, although most experienced hunters would say a little luck helps, but in my mind it’s an acquired skill that has taken years to develop.

First off you need to be in the country that your animal obviously is for starters.

Some animals are very cunning and you need to think like them to get close to them for a shot.

Look for sign, game trails, foot prints, scant, even hairs from their coat on fence wire, they all tell you something.

Where are they moving through this area, is there a water point, bedding area or out to feed in the pasture, all this you need to work with to increase your chances of seeing them!

What are the seasons, winter, summer, use this to your advantage in that summer time they would be watering daily, sometimes twice, so work watering points, winter not so, maybe every second day!

Is it breeding season, do the males have other things on their minds and change their habits?

You need to put all this together and your success will come.

Spend time out in the bush and watch and learn what animals do and the way the act.

All this will add to your understanding of them and increase your chance in finding them in the future!

 

 

hunting P1050018 1 Finding game!

                     Working a water point paid off with this mob found nearby!

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Finding game!”

  1. Hi Phil,

    “Well it’s not luck, although most experienced hunters would say a little luck helps, but in my mind it’s an acquired skill that has taken years to develop.”

    Couldn’t of said it better myself. I have had a handful of people question why I don’t shoot straight away whilst they’re sitting next to me. The answer is simple, ‘Watch and Learn’. By watching an animal, or several, whilst they are unaware of your presence, you can learn allot of their behaviour. This can make the difference between the trophy and the ‘Bugger All Mate’ trophy.

    Just my two cents.

    Pete.

  2. G’day Phil
    Pretty good straight forward article. Makes a lot of sense.
    As Pete said too “Watch & Learn” is the best.
    The only real way to get better at hunting is spending the time out there before squeezing the trigger.
    What I’ve learnt on hunting jaunts is to be ready for the unexpected.
    I’ve been quite surprised at times by animal behaviour by what I’ve come across during my times out in the field & I’m sure I will continue to do so.

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